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Who built the Georgia Guidestones PDF Print E-mail
Written by RC Christian   
Tuesday, 11 January 2011 12:10

The story behind the construction of "the thing" as related in a pamphlet found in  Elberton:

"Elberton Granite's reputation as one of the world's best monumental stones, Elbert County's geographic location, and fate seem to be key elements in why one of the nation's most unusual monuments was unveiled near Elberton, March 22, 1980. Already called "America's Stonehenge," after the mysterious monuments in England which have puzzled men for ages, THE GEORGIA GUIDESTONES has attracted nationwide publicity and promises to become a major tourist attraction.


Overwhelming in size and steeped in enigma, the GUIDESTONES was revealed to the nation in the Winter, 1979, ELBERTON GRANITEER -- and is as much a mystery now as it was then -- and probably still will be when man ceases to record his history. The gargantuan, six-piece monument stands 19-ft. high in the beautiful hill country eight miles north of Elberton and proclaims a message for the conservation of mankind. Its origins and sponsors are unknown; hence, the mystery.

Challenging Project

The components were manufactured from ELBERTON GRANITE FINISHING COMPANY, INC.'s "Pyramid Blue Granite", and the firm's President, Joe H. Fendley, Sr., said the project was one of the most challenging ever for his quarrying and monument manufacturing concern - partly because of the magnitude of the materials and partly because of the exacting specifications from the mysterious group of sponsors, "and those specifications were so precise that they had to be compiled by experts on stone as well as construction," said Fendley.

He said it all began late on a Friday afternoon in June when a well-dressed and articulate man walked into his offices on the Tate Street Extension in Elberton and wanted to know the cost of building a large monument to conservation. He identified himself as "Mr. Christian." He told Fendley that he represented a small group of loyal Americans living outside Georgia who wished to remain anonymous forever, and that he chose the name "Christian" because he was a Christian. He inquired where Fendley banked and Joe put him in touch with both local banks. Wyatt C. Martin, President of the Granite City Bank, was selected by "Mr. Christian" to be the intermediary for the mysterious project.

According to Martin, the man showed up at his office 30 minutes later, explained the project, and said after completion he hoped other conservation-minded groups would erect even more stones in an outer ring and carry the monuments message in more languages. He told Martin that he wanted the monument erected in a remote area away from the main tourist centers. The gentleman also said that Georgia was selected because of the availability of excellent granite, generally mild climate, and the fact that his great-grandmother was a native Georgian.

Elbert County Chosen

Martin persuaded the mystery man that Elbert County was the ideal location for the memorial; and he agreed, provided a suitable location could be found. He returned later and he and Martin inspected sites. "Mr. Christian", who now called himself "R. C. Christian", chose a five-acre plot on the farm of contractor Wayne Mullenix. It is the highest point in Elbert County. A few weeks later , Martin contacted Joe Findley and told him that funds for the project were in an escrow account and to start work immediately. Martin promised that when the project was completed, he would deliver his file on the affair to the anonymous sponsors and that the secret would never be known.

He said "Christian" told him that the sponsors had planned the monument for years and that the ten "guides" for the conservation of mankind and the earth were carefully worded as a moralistic appeal to all peoples of nationality, religion, or politics.

The guides are brief maxims espousing population control and other conservation messages in eight languages. The guides are inscribed in eight different languages on four huge stones set in a paddlewheel arrangement with the center stone carved and drilled so that the sun will mark the time of day and the seasons.

An authority on the hermetic and alchemical traditions that spawned the Rosicrucians, Weidner has a theory about the purpose of the Guidestones. believes that for generations the group has been passing down knowledge of a solar cycle that climaxes every 13,000 years. During this culmination, outsize coronal mass ejections are supposed to devastate Earth. Meanwhile, the shadowy organization behind the Guidestones is now orchestrating a “planetary chaos,” Weidner believes, that began with the recent collapse of the US financial system and will result eventually in major disruptions of oil and food supplies, mass riots, and ethnic wars worldwide, all leading up to the Big Event on December 21, 2012. “They want to get the population down,” Weidner says, “and this is what they think will do it. The Guidestones are there to instruct the survivors.”

On hearing Weidner’s ideas, Martin shakes his head and says it’s “the sort of thing that makes me want to tell people everything I know.” Martin has long since retired from banking and no longer lives in Elberton, yet he’s still the Guidestones’ official—and only—secret-keeper. “But I can’t tell,” the old man quickly adds. “I made a promise.” Martin also made a promise to destroy all the records of his dealings with Christian, though he hasn’t kept that one—at least not yet. In the back of his garage is a large plastic bin (actually, the hard-sided case of an IBM computer he bought back in 1983) stuffed with every document connected to the Guidestones that ever came into his possession, including the letters from Christian.

For years Martin thought he might write a book, but now he knows he probably won’t. What he also won’t do is allow me to look through the papers. When I ask whether he’s prepared to take what he knows to his grave, Martin replies that Christian would want him to do just that: “All along, he said that who he was and where he came from had to be kept a secret. He said mysteries work that way. If you want to keep people interested, you can let them know only so much.” The rest is enshrouded in the vast sunny stillness.

Last Updated on Monday, 09 May 2011 16:51
 

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